Dear Woodcroft Residents,

 

In 2019, the WCA added an initiative to our landscape maintenance—removing invasive plants. Here’s why:

Since Europeans began colonizing North America, thousands of plants have been introduced from other parts of the world. Some are spreading out of control, causing environmental and/or economic harm. In Woodcroft, these invasive plants are overrunning woodlands, damaging trees and displacing native plants that are a crucial part of our ecosystem.

 

Common Invasive Plants in Woodcroft (see photos below)

Ground covers and vines:  Ivy, Japanese honeysuckle, liriope, periwinkle, wintercreeper, wisteria

Shrubs:  autumn olive and other Eleagnus species, burning bush, mahonia, nandina, privet

Trees: Bradford pear, mimosa, tree of heaven. (See ARB Guidelines for tree removal.)

 

Prevent Invasive Plants from Overrunning Our Woodlands

(1) Don’t buy them.

(2) Don’t allow invasive ground covers to grow up trees and beyond your property lines.

(3) Remove seeds and berries on invasive plants as soon as they appear.

(4) Better yet—remove the entire invasive plant.

 

Removal Activities and Methods

Woodcroft Community Association is working with companies certified to remove invasives. This work requires herbicides (primarily triclopyr), applied by basal bark and foliar spraying and cutting-and-painting, using the least amount and lowest effective concentration. Signs will be posted in treated areas as needed; areas can be reentered when the herbicide is dry.

 

We need your help! Woodcroft residents who have invasive plants on their property will be notified and encouraged to remove or control them. The notice will include type of plant(s), recommended removal method(s), and resources to contact for help. Thanks for helping to preserve native plants and minimize invasives in our yards and woodlands!

 

Questions?    Contact T. R. O’Neill, HOA manager: tr@casnc.com

 

Thanks for helping to preserve native plants and minimize invasives in our yards and woodlands!

Dear Woodcroft Residents,

 

In 2019, the WCA added an initiative to our landscape maintenance—removing invasive plants. Here’s why:

Since Europeans began colonizing North America, thousands of plants have been introduced from other parts of the world. Some are spreading out of control, causing environmental and/or economic harm. In Woodcroft, these invasive plants are overrunning woodlands, damaging trees and displacing native plants that are a crucial part of our ecosystem.

 

Common Invasive Plants in Woodcroft (see photos below)

Ground covers and vines:  Ivy, Japanese honeysuckle, liriope, periwinkle, wintercreeper, wisteria

Shrubs:  autumn olive and other Eleagnus species, burning bush, mahonia, nandina, privet

Trees: Bradford pear, mimosa, tree of heaven. (See ARB Guidelines for tree removal.)

 

Prevent Invasive Plants from Overrunning Our Woodlands

(1) Don’t buy them.

(2) Don’t allow invasive ground covers to grow up trees and beyond your property lines.

(3) Remove seeds and berries on invasive plants as soon as they appear.

(4) Better yet—remove the entire invasive plant.

 

Removal Activities and Methods

Woodcroft Community Association is working with companies certified to remove invasives. This work requires herbicides (primarily triclopyr), applied by basal bark and foliar spraying and cutting-and-painting, using the least amount and lowest effective concentration. Signs will be posted in treated areas as needed; areas can be reentered when the herbicide is dry.

 

We need your help! Woodcroft residents who have invasive plants on their property will be notified and encouraged to remove or control them. The notice will include type of plant(s), recommended removal method(s), and resources to contact for help. Thanks for helping to preserve native plants and minimize invasives in our yards and woodlands!

 

Questions? Contact Lynn Richardson, and Leslie Fiddler

 

Thanks for helping to preserve native plants and minimize invasives in our yards and woodlands!

Worst Offenders—Groundcovers

English ivy

 J. Neal  CC BY – 4.0

Japanese honeysuckle

  U CT Invasive Plant Working Group

Wintercreeper

TN Invasive Plant Council 

Liriope

Growgardener.com

Worst Offenders—Shrubs / Trees

Autumn olive

inaturalist

Chinese privet

Wolf River Conservancy

Nandina

TN Invasive Plant Council

Mahonia

TN Invasive Plant Council 

Burning bush

Mykola Swarnyk CC BY-SA 3.0

Bradford pear

Nancy Loewenstein, Auburn University, bugwood.org